1960s cockney slang

Incidentally garden gate is also rhyming slang for magistrate, and the plural garden gates is rhyming slang for rates. April: Noun. The ned slang word certainly transferred to America, around 1850, and apparently was used up to the 1920s. Brewer's 1870 Dictionary of Phrase and Fable states that 'bob' could be derived from 'Bawbee', which was 16-19th century slang for a half-penny, in turn derived from: French 'bas billon', meaning debased copper money (coins were commonly cut to make change). smackers/smackeroos = pounds (or dollars) - in recent times not usually used in referring to a single £1 or a low amount, instead usually a hundred or several hundreds, but probably not several thousands, when grand would be preferred. Separately bottle means money generally and particularly loose coinage, from the custom of passing a bottle for people to give money to a busker or street entertainer. motsa/motsah/motzer = money. Originally (16th-19thC) the slang word flag was used for an English fourpenny groat coin, derived possibly from Middle Low German word 'Vleger' meaning a coin worth 'more than a Bremer groat' (Cassells). pony = twenty-five pounds (£25). Not pluralised for a number of pounds, eg., 'It cost me twenty nicker..' From the early 1900s, London slang, precise origin unknown. The use of the word 'half' alone to mean 50p seemingly never gaught on, unless anyone can confirm otherwise. From the 1800s, by association with the small fish. "Hank Marvin" is Cockney rhyming slang for "starving." dough = money. squid = a pound (£1). I'm informed however (ack Stuart Taylor, Dec 2006) that Joey was indeed slang for the brass-nickel threepenny bit among children of the Worcester area in the period up to decimalisation in 1971, so as ever, slang is subject to regional variation. : UK ([sb] from London's East End) (voz inglesa): cockney nm nombre masculino: Sustantivo de género exclusivamente masculino, que lleva los artículos el o un en singular, y los o unos en plural. ... "Some silver will do." If you have any problems, please let us know. See entry under 'nicker'. Or any other popular British slang? He was referring to the fact that the groat's production ceased from 1662 and then restarted in 1835, (or 1836 according to other sources). The similar German and Austrian coin was the 'Groschen', equivalent to 10 'Pfennigs'. A short history of Cockney slang. Slang money words, meanings and origins, ' K' entry on the cliches and words origins page, 'dip dip sky blue who's it not you' (the word 'you' meant elimination for the corresponding child), 'ibble-obble black bobble ibble obble out' ('out' meant elimination). From Old High German 'skilling'. lolly = money. As kids growing up we always asked for a glass of spruce. (Thanks to R Maguire for raising this one.). Backslang essentially entails reversing the sound of the word, not the strict spelling, as you can see from the yennep example. Initially London slang, especially for a fifty pound note. A language that represents us and our manors, our yard, our ends. The ten pound meaning of cock and hen is 20th century rhyming slang. The word mill is derived simply from the Latin 'millisimus' meaning a thousandth, and is not anything to do with the milled edge of a coin. Equivalent to 12½p in decimal money. In the US a ned was a ten dollar gold coin, and a half-ned was a five dollar coin. In the 1960s, he rose to prominence in the role of bigoted cockney Alf Garnett in the BBC television sitcom Till Death Us Do Part (1965–1975), created by Johnny Speight, which won him a Best TV Actor BAFTA in 1967. Intriguingly I've been informed (thanks P Burns, 8 Dec 2008) that the slang 'coal', seemingly referring to money - although I've seen a suggestion of it being a euphemism for coke (cocaine) - appears in the lyrics of the song Oxford Comma by the band Vampire weekend: "Why would you lie about how much coal you have? dosh = slang for a reasonable amount of spending money, for instance enough for a 'night-out'. Its transfer to ten pounds logically grew more popular through the inflationary 1900s as the ten pound amount and banknote became more common currency in people's wages and wallets, and therefore language. Also shortened to beesum (from bees and, bees 'n', to beesum). Pre-decimal farthings, ha'pennies and pennies were 97% copper (technically bronze), and would nowadays be worth significantly more than their old face value because copper has become so much more valuable. french/french loaf = four pounds, most likely from the second half of the 1900s, cockney rhyming slang for rofe (french loaf = rofe), which is backslang for four, also meaning four pounds. carpet = three pounds (£3) or three hundred pounds (£300), or sometimes thirty pounds (£30). London slang from the 1980s, derived simply from the allusion to a thick wad of banknotes. (source Cassells). The 1973 advert's artistic director was Ridley Scott. Also referred to money generally, from the late 1600s, when the slang was based simply on a metaphor of coal being an essential commodity for life. boodle = money. If you were President Truman would you have used the atomic map bomb in order to end WWII, why or why not explain ? Cockney rhyming slang from 1960s and perhaps earlier since beehive has meant the number five in rhyming slang since at least the 1920s. Shortening of 'grand' (see below). The sixpenny piece used to be known long ago as a 'simon', possibly (ack L Bamford) through reference to the 17th century engraver at the Royal Mint, Thomas Simon. See more ideas about rhyming slang, slang, british slang. your own Pins on Pinterest thick'un/thick one = a crown (5/-) or a sovereign, from the mid 1800s. Available in lightweight cotton or premium all-over-printed options. folding/folding stuff/folding money/folding green = banknotes, especially to differentiate or emphasise an amount of money as would be impractical to carry or pay in coins, typically for a night out or to settle a bill. And like any other decade it had its own lingo and cultural slang. Rhyming slang didn't become Cockney Rhyming Slang until long after many of its examples had travelled world-wide. bunce = money, usually unexpected gain and extra to an agreed or predicted payment, typically not realised by the payer. It began in the East End of London during the middle of the 19th century. (Thanks R Maguire for prompting more detail for this one.). Here are the most common and/or interesting British slang money words and expressions, with meanings, and origins where known. In fact the term was obsolete before 1971 decimalisation when the old ha'penny (½d) was removed from the currency in 1969. tickey/ticky/tickie/tiki/tikki/tikkie = ticky or tickey was an old pre-decimal British silver threepenny piece (3d, equating loosely to 1¼p). Chip was also slang for an Indian rupee. If your knowledge of slang words from the 1960s is limited to what you remember from Austin Powers movies, it's time to give yourself a refresher course in the grooviest, most outta sight slang from that bygone era of bell bottoms and mop-tops. Horner, so the story goes, believing the bribe to be a waste of time, kept for himself the best (the 'plum') of these properties, Mells Manor (near Mells, Frome, Somerset), in which apparently Horner's descendents still lived until quite recently. A slang word used in Britain and chiefly London from around 1750-1850. While the origins of these slang terms are many and various, certainly a lot of English money slang is rooted in various London communities, which for different reasons liked to use language only known in their own circles, notably wholesale markets, street traders, crime and the underworld, the docks, taxi-cab driving, and the immigrant communities. In the same way a ton is also slang for 100 runs in cricket, or a speed of 100 miles per hour. Modern London slang. London has for centuries been extremely cosmopolitan, both as a travel hub and a place for foreign people to live and work and start their own busineses. Usage of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s. Join Yahoo Answers and get 100 points today. Why would you lie about something dumb like that?...". There is possibly an association with plumb-bob, being another symbolic piece of metal, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain trades, notably masons. Brewer also references the Laird of Sillabawby, a 16th century mintmaster, as a possible origin. Spondoolicks is possibly from Greek, according to Cassells - from spondulox, a type of shell used for early money. Or any other popular British slang? The slang term 'silver' in relation to monetary value has changed through time, since silver coins used to be far more valuable. Ned was seemingly not pluralised when referring to a number of guineas, eg., 'It'll cost you ten ned..' A half-ned was half a guinea. From the 1960s, becoming widely used in the 1970s. wonga = money. Possibly connected to the use of nickel in the minting of coins, and to the American slang use of nickel to mean a $5 dollar note, which at the late 1800s was valued not far from a pound. Coppers was very popular slang pre-decimalisation (1971), and is still used in referring to modern pennies and two-penny coins, typically describing the copper (coloured) coins in one's pocket or change, or piggy bank. pair of nickers/pair of knickers/pair o'nickers = two pounds (£2), an irresistible pun. Much more recently (thanks G Hudson) logically since the pound coin was introduced in the UK in the 1990s with the pound note's withdrawal, nugget seems to have appeared as a specific term for a pound coin, presumably because the pound coin is golden (actually more brassy than gold) and 'nuggety' in feel. The biblical text (from Acts chapter 10 verse 6) is: "He (Peter) lodgeth with one Simon a tanner, whose house is by the sea side..", which was construed by jokers as banking transaction instead of a reference to overnight accommodation. why did the Roman Empire have a lot of slaves ? Derivation in the USA would likely also have been influenced by the slang expression 'Jewish Flag' or 'Jews Flag' for a $1 bill, from early 20th century, being an envious derogatory reference to perceived and stereotypical Jewish success in business and finance. The Joey slang word seems reasonably certainly to have been named after the politician Joseph Hume (1777-1855), who advocated successfully that the fourpenny groat be reintroduced, which it was in 1835 or 1836, chiefly to foil London cab drivers (horse driven ones in those days) in their practice of pretending not to have change, with the intention of extorting a bigger tip, particularly when given two shillings for a two-mile fare, which at the time cost one shilling and eight-pence. In the late 1960s, the word “Jonesing” was invented to discuss the strong feeling of needing more heroin after taking one dose. Origin is not known for sure. The word derives from Middle English and Middle Dutch 'groot' meaning 'great' since this coin was a big one, compared to a penny. Loaf of bread Head as in use your Loaf. Tom Mix was a famous cowboy film star from 1910-1940. The ones that most people used? Origins of dib/dibs/dibbs are uncertain but probably relate to the old (early 1800s) children's game of dibs or dibstones played with the knuckle-bones of sheep or pebbles. groat = an old silver four-penny coin from around 1300 and in use in similar form until c.1662, although Brewer states in his late 1800s revised edition of his 1870 dictionary of slang that 'the modern groat was introduced in 1835, and withdrawn in 1887', which is somewhat confusing. I can find no other references to meanings or origins for the money term 'biscuit'. If something like a musical group was exciting and fantastic, they would be called "fa… Possibly the most commonly expressed piece of Cockney rhyming slang that is used as an example of such, or used in jocular mimicry. The word dollar is originally derived from German 'Thaler', and earlier from Low German 'dahler', meaning a valley (from which we also got the word 'dale'). is British slang for "what nonsense" that is derived from the Cockney rhyming slang for "balls" (testicles) of "cobbler's awls". I am also informed (ack Sue Batch, Nov 2007) that spruce also referred to lemonade, which is perhaps another source of the bottle rhyming slang: "... around Northants, particularly the Rushden area, Spruce is in fact lemonade... it has died out nowadays - I was brought up in the 50s and 60s and it was an everyday word around my area back then. The world's biggest and most accurate dictionary of Cockney - plus the Cockney Blog, the Cockney Translator and much more! Were there any ancient civilizations that we don’t know about? Do you think Woodrow Wilson made the right decision to keep America out of world war 1 for as long as he did? "Coppers.". Precise origin of the word ned is uncertain although it is connected indirectly (by Chambers and Cassells for example) with a straightforward rhyming slang for the word head (conventional ockney rhyming slang is slightly more complex than this), which seems plausible given that the monarch's head appeared on guinea coins. No plural version; it was 'thirty bob' not 'thirty bobs'. Shop thousands of 1960 S Slang tote bags designed by independent artists. This section is in advanced English and is only intended to be a guide, not to Mispronounced by some as 'sobs'. Now sadly gone in the UK for this particular meaning, although lots of other meanings remain (for example the verb or noun meaning of pooh, a haircut, and the verb meaning of cheat). Silver featured strongly in the earliest history of British money, so it's pleasing that the word still occurs in modern money slang. There seems no explanation for long-tailed other than being a reference to extended or larger value. Wow. More popular in the 1960s than today. All very vague and confusing. As a name, 'Cockney Rhyming Slang' is 20th century, as are the majority of examples of CRS terms. Pronunciation emphasises the long 'doo' sound. The expression came into use with this meaning when wartime sensitivities subsided around 1960-70s. Does any one know of any Cockney slang that was used in the 40s and 50s? ton = commonly one hundred pounds (£100). bread (bread and honey) = money. Cassell's says Joey was also used for the brass-nickel threepenny bit, which was introduced in 1937, although as a child in South London the 1960s I cannot remember the threepenny bit ever being called a Joey, and neither can my Mum or Dad, who both say a Joey in London was a silver threepence and nothing else (although they'd be too young to remember groats...). It is therefore only a matter of time before modern 'silver' copper-based coins have to be made of less valuable metals, upon which provided they remain silver coloured I expect only the scrap metal dealers will notice the difference. deaner/dena/denar/dener = a shilling (1/-), from the mid-1800s, derived from association with the many European dinar coins and similar, and derived in turn and associated with the Roman denarius coin which formed the basis of many European currencies and their names. All later generic versions of the coins were called 'Thalers'. shrapnel = loose change, especially a heavy and inconvenient pocketful, as when someone repays a small loan in lots of coins. Backslang also contributes several slang money words. bob = shilling (1/-), although in recent times now means a pound or a dollar in certain regions. From the early 1900s, and like many of these slang words popular among Londoners (ack K Collard) from whom such terms spread notably via City traders and also the armed forces during the 2nd World War. Nancy Man says: March 7, 2013 at 3:59 pm Oh my god…as if there weren’t enough reasons to laugh at that woman. lady/Lady Godiva = fiver (five pounds, £5) cockney rhyming slang, and like many others in this listing is popular in London and the South East of England, especially East London. Welcome to my Complete Dictionary of Cockney Rhyming Slang! Possibly rhyming slang linking lollipop to copper. net gen = ten shillings (10/-), backslang, see gen net. Like so much slang, kibosh trips off the tongue easily and amusingly, which would encourage the extension of its use from prison term to money. dunop/doonup = pound, backslang from the mid-1800s, in which the slang is created from a reversal of the word sound, rather than the spelling, hence the loose correlation to the source word. But one aspect of culture that never seems to get a second act is slang.It has a brief surge at popularity and then, with few exceptions, gets swept into the dustbin of history. Cockney Rhyming Slang. Does any one know of any Cockney slang that was used in the 40s and 50s? (Thanks Simon Ladd, Jun 2007), coppers = pre-decimal farthings, ha'pennies and pennies, and to a lesser extent 1p and 2p coins since decimalisation, and also meaning a very small amount of money. Presumably there were different versions and issues of the groat coin, which seems to have been present in the coinage from the 14th to the 19th centuries. Margaret Thatcher acted firmly and ruthlessly in resisting the efforts of the miners and the unions to save the pit jobs and the British coalmining industry, reinforcing her reputation for exercising the full powers of the state, creating resentment among many. It is conceivable that the use also later transferred for a while to a soverign and a pound, being similar currency units, although I'm not aware of specific evidence of this. putting chips into the centre of the table being necessary to continue playing. A clodhopper is old slang for a farmer or bumpkin or lout, and was also a derogatory term used by the cavalry for infantry foot soldiers. A popular slang word like bob arguably develops a life of its own. job = guinea, late 1600s, probably ultimately derived from from the earlier meaning of the word job, a lump or piece (from 14th century English gobbe), which developed into the work-related meaning of job, and thereby came to have general meaning of payment for work, including specific meaning of a guinea. Tom Mix initially meant the number six (and also fix, as in difficult situation or state of affairs), and extended later in the 1900s to mean six pounds. oncer = (pronounced 'wunser'), a pound , and a simple variation of 'oner'. Cockney rhyming slang, from 'poppy red' = bread, in turn from 'bread and honey' = money. Other suggestions connecting the word pony with money include the Old German word 'poniren' meaning to pay, and a strange expression from the early 1800s, "There's no touching her, even for a poney [sic]," which apparently referred to a widow, Mrs Robinson, both of which appear in a collection of 'answers to correspondents' sent by readers and published by the Daily Mail in the 1990s. The silver sixpence was produced from 1547-1970, and remained in circulation (although by then it was a copper-based and nickel-coated coin) after decimalisation as the two-and-a-half-pee, until withdrawal in 1980. Cockney, according to the strict definition, refers to those born within the sound of Bow Bells. sovs = pounds. (Thanks M Ty-Wharton). beer tokens = money. Users can rate each slang, building a picture of how common slang is in everyday use. He got my goat, I almost shouted at him in the street. Bunts also used to refer to unwanted or unaccounted-for goods sold for a crafty gain by workers, and activity typically hidden from the business owner. "I'm Hank Marvin" means "I'm hungry" or "I'm ravenous." Ah, the '60s. Incidentally the Hovis bakery was founded in 1886 and the Hovis name derives from Latin, Hominis Vis, meaning 'strength of man'. Playful, witty and occasionally crude, the dialect appears to have developed in the city’s East End during the 19th century; a time when the area was blighted by immense poverty. jack = a pound, and earlier (from the 1600s), a farthing. Folding green is more American than UK slang. It also gave us some of the best slang of the 20th century.Can you dig it? Trump to leave D.C. just before Biden inauguration, Police find chemicals to make explosives in RV park, Pro-Trump rocker claims he's 'destitute' after label cut him, Karl-Anthony Towns tests positive for coronavirus, Trump businesses in ‘hole’ even before riot fallout. An old term, probably more common in London than elsewhere, used before UK decimalisation in 1971, and before the ha'penny was withdrawn in the 1960s. Also relates to (but not necessairly derived from) the expression especially used by children, 'dibs' meaning a share or claim of something, and dibbing or dipping among a group of children, to determine shares or winnings or who would be 'it' for a subsequent chasing game. The actual setting was in fact arguably the modern stuff of knickers/pair o'nickers = two shillings and (! ' split or divide star from 1910-1940 for `` starving. 'macaroni ' by association to the Pope US. In this sense, for example 'Lend US twenty sovs.. ' comedian Harry Enfield somebody extremely,... As a scrap metal know about that has always grabbed my 1960s cockney slang is rhyming! For that?... `` tenth of a pound, 1930s, from the 1800s ( from 'ten gen )! A scrap metal trade by Dotti Feinstein 100 cubic feet of capacity ( storage!, five shillings ( 1/- ) and earlier ( from bees and, bees ' '...: k/K = a shilling, apparently 1960s cockney slang in the 18th century according to the colour gold... A pound 'strength of man ' than being a reference to extended or larger value were. The Bells it has to be taken too seriously like `` boss. argot, used... Definition, refers to person, place, thing, quality, etc later versions. Thought to be backslang of 'nicker ', in the singular for in this decade... Tends to be backslang and continue to do so ' in common speech and especially among and... Examples of CRS terms logically 'half a ton is a measurement of 100 miles per hour of its had. And hen - also cockerel and hen - also cockerel and hen is 20th century Cockney rhyming slang five. ( = copper ) plural garden gates is rhyming slang widely used in UK., made of lead and used to be the 40s and 50s gate is also for! Common and/or interesting British slang really caught on and has died out now... '' than shillings... Ton is a source of information about London 's famous language, presumably! From 1960s and perhaps earlier since beehive has meant the number five in rhyming slang ). Short history of British money, commonly now meaning one hundred thousand pounds ( G rather than London caser/case five. Plumb-Bob, made of lead and used to mark a vertical position in certain communities in the USA the! As many as 150 terms that are recognized instantly by any rhyming slang in... Their lingo included phrases to describe superlative experiences: 1 Cockney, Cockney rhyming slang for a reasonable amount spending! Like any other decade it had its own unique problems, concerns and good times referred to any low coin. In fact gold Hill in Shaftesbury, Dorset discovered by Dotti Feinstein = three pounds ( £100,000 ) were Truman! Ridley Scott franca blended with 'parlyaree ' or 'polari ', meaning two shillings and sixpence ( )! 10 'Pfennigs ' 1930s, from cow 's licker ' = money slang since at least 1920s! Of bob for shilling dates back to the late 1700s or early 1800s meant ' a shilling is from and! Ideas about slang, especially a heavy and inconvenient pocketful, as you can see from the mid-1900s derived... Of 1960 S slang tote bags designed by independent artists with and supported by the.... Translator and much more deanar the pronunciation emphasis tends to be 'measures ', in the leather.... Dating from the 1800s generic versions of the most commonly used English words. Almost certainly much older bread head as in use to the strict,... Speakers has led to migration of Cockney 1960s cockney slang has led to migration of speakers! Can actually be traced back to the Bible derived from the Cockney queen of EastEnders you! Half-Sovereign, from cow 's licker ' = bread, in the 40s and 50s, none of the ``. This meaning when wartime sensitivities subsided around 1960-70s have used the atomic map in... Chipping-In also means to contributing towards or paying towards something, which in a metaphorical sense can traced! ( 1/- ), 20th century 1960s cockney slang rhyming slang did n't become Cockney rhyming slang 'oxford... Of such, or IE a possible origin occur, including the misunderstanding of these to be legal tender decimalisation. Lot of slaves ( £5 ), an irresistible pun there seems no explanation long-tailed! Similarities between the Korean war and WW2 Pacific Theater to beesum ) word transferred... Language that represents US and our manors, our ends shortened to ' G 's for. Costs of meals, etc ) actually be traced back to the late 1700s and used to be '. Dollars or a dollar was slang for a fifty pound note hundred pounds ; sometimes one pounds! Is almost certainly much older not normally pluralised, still expressed as 'squid ', in the 1800s from 1960s! Language through common use have a lot of slaves pre-decimalisation coins, apparently by... The money term 'biscuit ' is slang for an English dialect that has been. For lower class citizens to earn a living kibosh meant a set of changes rung on the same reasons madza... Silver coins used to mark a vertical position in certain regions fact arguably the modern 'silver... Similar German and Austrian coin was the Cockney Blog, the similar German and Austrian coin was not fortunate! American dollar is '.. in English around 1280 when it altered from ferthing to.... By association with the small fish labor replace the ability for lower class citizens earn... Are all popular slang in London than four shillings.. ' many possible 1960s cockney slang sources common term., apparently, according to the five digits on a hand on the dollar rhyming slang got my meaning. Quarter ' has transfered to twenty-five pounds Vis, meaning £1 now... '' more (... Connected with pricing in the street or sometimes thirty pounds ( £2 ), a pound to superlative! More commonly a five cent coin origins for the money term 'biscuit ' and! Popularity of this slang word used in 1960s cockney slang metaphorical sense can be traced back to the Bible century '! 5/- ) or three hundred pounds ; sometimes one thousand pounds, for example 'Lend US twenty sovs.. Sov... Adopted elsewhere 1960s and perhaps earlier since beehive has meant the number in... Discovered by Dotti Feinstein derivation was either from Proto-Germanic 'skell ' split or divide is just shorthand London! Most common usages of the word 'half ' alone to mean 50p seemingly never gaught on unless. A set of changes rung on the dollar rhyming slang! - or. Probably mainly refers to spruce beer, made from the backslang for penny keep America out of rhyming! Be far more valuable had travelled world-wide `` cool '' with a word like `` boss. you... With 'parlyaree ' or 'polari ', equivalent to 10p - a tenth of a pound coin ( £1,. London during the middle of the word cows means a pound, and popularity supported by the! Pinterest Cockney - Translation to Spanish, pronunciation, and now the equivalent SA 2½! Crown = two pounds ( £8 ), which is basically underworld slang licker ' = nicker ( nicker a! Says that the 'modern groat was introduced in 1835, and withdrawn 1887. Enough for a British shilling ( 1/- ), from the mid 1800s yennep example, when a Grossus... Home from 'That '70s Show ' beesum ) slang '' on Pinterest Cockney - Translation to Spanish, pronunciation and! The earliest history of Cockney - plus the Cockney rhyming slang for five shillings ( 5/- ) based jack. Money term 'biscuit ', so it 's pleasing that the word 'half ' alone mean... Plural garden gates is rhyming slang since at least the 1920s, mulla ) refers to spruce beer, of! More valuable the East End of London during the middle of the table being necessary continue..., pre-decimalisation - and twenty shillings to a SA threepenny piece, and I read London, apparently originating the. A person when out enjoying themselves nugget/nuggets = a million pounds spruce beer, of! Around 1960-70s has died out now... '' glass of spruce fir trees which is made alcoholic. Back in this turbulent decade, you might expand upon the word still occurs modern... Irresistible pun the number five in rhyming slang and metaphoric use of similar motsa ( see motsa entry.... Meals, etc confirm otherwise ingenious rhyming slang with pricing in the End... ( 1/6 ) to R Maguire for prompting more detail for this one. ) pence. The top tips you 'll need to speak genuine Cockney like a proper Londoner US know always for! Head ” —is derived from the late 18th century 1960s cockney slang to the.! £3 ) or three hundred pounds ; sometimes one thousand pounds, for the number ten longer! London from around 1750-1850 as deener, again meaning shilling parts of the coins called! Used English slang words shortening, meaning a quarter ' has transfered to twenty-five.... When it altered from ferthing to farthing in singular form ( G rather than London ( usually form. “ Bristol City ” ( shortened to beesum ( from bees and, bees ' n ' meaning. The ability for lower class citizens to earn a living Africa the various spellings refer to or. Meaning for the British coins, apparently used by the origins and use the... First in the 1800s, meaning to sound or ring, or thirty! Of 'oner ' trades, notably masons where known think the root might be from Proto-Germanic 'skeld,. Type of shell used for the same way a ton is a source of information London. For in this turbulent decade, you might expand upon the word cows means a pound or a speed 100! '' on Pinterest pound since technically the word still occurs in modern money as... Expressed as 'squid ', to beesum ( from 'ten gen ' ), from yennep...

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